Prospect of minimum income gaining steam

From the National Post

At a Montreal convention in 2014 when the Liberal party was a lowly third power in Parliament, its members passed Policy Resolution 100, pledging to create a “Basic Annual Income” to solve problems in the social safety net, from pension risk to seasonal worker benefits.

That promise, to guarantee a minimum income, has a new urgency entering 2016, as the new Liberal majority government brings that platform to life in a country clamouring for new ways to manage welfare and benefits.

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Namibian president unleashes new plan for Basic Income Grant

After months of meetings, studies and reports on Basic Income, Namibia takes another step forward towards adopting a basic income policy. President Hage Geingob has announced new plans that will aim to eradicate poverty by 2025. At the heart of this radical strategy is the introduction of basic income grants.

The “Harambe towards prosperity” Masterplan sets out a variety of new policy ideas to kick-start the Namibian economy. These ideas are aimed at building a stronger infrastructure, and introducing major economic and social developments.

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The economy is a subset of society, not other way around, says retired planner

Roderick Benns recently interviewed Alan Gummo, a retired city and regional planner. Gummo was also a public policy researcher and worked in municipal administration. He was a member of the Canadian Institute of Planners, the Ontario Professional Planners Institute, and the Institute of Public Administration. He is active in the basic income movement and now divides his time between Kingston, Ontario and Sao Paulo, Brazil. 

Benns: How did you come to be involved with advocating for a basic income guarantee? 

Gummo: I first learned of the BIG concept (Basic Income Guarantee) when I was in grad school in the 1970’s. The Dauphin pilot project was on our curriculum. It sounded like a logical ‘next step’ in the evolution of progressive public policy. I was disappointed when the pilot was abandoned. Indeed I was disappointed with a large number of public policy decisions that were made over the following decades and seemed to take us away from a progressive direction.

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Think tank floats 'basic income' idea for all citizens

A think tank is calling for fundamental change to the system of tax and benefits in the UK.

The Royal Society for the encouragement of Arts, Manufactures and Commerce (RSA) is recommending a basic universal income.

In a new report, the author calls the approach the best alternative "to help people improve their own lives."

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Kingston becomes first Canadian municipality to call for basic income guarantee

By Roderick Benns 

Publisher of Leaders and Legacies, a social purpose news site

The City of Kingston has become the first municipality in Canada to call for the development of a basic income guarantee for all Canadians. 

Council recently and unanimously passed a motion calling for a national discussion on the issue, hoping this will lead the provinces and federal government to work together to “consider, investigate, and develop a Basic Income Guarantee for all Canadians.”

A basic income guarantee is known by many names, including a guaranteed annual income, a minimum income and a negative income tax, among others. But the essence is that it ensures everyone an income that is sufficient to meet their basic needs, regardless of work status. It provides a direct cash transfer to the people who most need economic security.

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Saskatchewan New Democrats call for a guaranteed basic income pilot project

Saskatchewan's New Democrats want the government to pilot and evaluate a guaranteed basic income program and, if the results prove successful, they want the program introduced province-wide, as a key measure to tackle poverty and improve health, social and economic outcomes.

A basic income program, which can be delivered through a cash transfer model or a negative income tax, is a much simpler and more streamlined approach than current income security programs, and many experts argue it is also a much more effective approach at reducing poverty.

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Food banks help the donor, but don't fix the problem: professor

From CBC News

A university professor in Nova Scotia says while turkey drives and food banks make the donors feel good — they don't fix a much larger problem of helping the poor.

Judy Haiven, who teaches in the Management Department at the Sobey School of Business at Saint Mary's University, is also the chair of the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives in Nova Scotia.

Haiven took exception earlier this year when she heard CBC Radio's Sunday Edition rebroadcast remarks on giving socks for the homeless, with host Michael Enright.

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