Whether left or right, basic income just makes sense: Hugh Segal

By Roderick Benns

Publisher of Leaders and Legacies, a social purpose news site

There’s a reason the issue of a basic income guarantee never seems to go away, says retired Conservative Senator Hugh Segal — the idea simply makes too much sense. Basic income (also called a guaranteed annual income) would see any Canadian who falls below the poverty line topped up with enough money to cover a basic living standard. Almost all models for basic income implementation would see it replace provincial welfare systems.

Segal says there are three things driving the support for this policy change.

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Montreal-area mayor says basic income needed to end poverty

By Roderick Benns

Publisher of Leaders and Legacies, a social purpose news site

A Montreal-area mayor says it’s time to adopt a basic income policy in Canada to eliminate poverty. Mayor Danie Deschenes of NotreDame-de-l’ÎlePerrot, just west of the island of Montreal in Quebec, says “all elected officials could be supporting the idea of all citizens having a basic income.”

She sees it as a way to overcome poor housing and a sub-standard quality of life for people.

“As elected officials, we should strive to improve our citizens’ lives and the lives of their children,” says Deschenes.

 

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‘There’s a good case to be made for a basic income:’ Halifax mayor

By Roderick Benns

Publisher of Leaders and Legacies, a social purpose news site

Another big city mayor in Canada says he supports the concept of a basic income guarantee to combat inequality and create better social cohesion. Halifax Mayor Mike Savage says “there’s a good case to be made for a basic income,” pointing out there are many advantages in ensuring that people have their basic needs met.

“I think we would have more social cohesion and a better balance of opportunities. We would have a narrowing of the gap between the very rich and the very poor. And we would have a more productive workforce because many would access new opportunities,” says Savage, who heads the largest city in the Atlantic Region of Canada.

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Five New Brunswick mayors say it’s time for basic income across Canada

By Roderick Benns

Publisher of Leaders and Legacies, a social purpose news site

Five mayors from New Brunswick are speaking out in favour of basic income guarantee policy — including the mayor of Fredericton, the capital city.

Bill Bishop (Rothesay - top left photo); Yvon Lapierre (Dieppe - top centre); Gerry Cormier (Miramichi - bottom left); Cyrille Simard (Edmundston - bottom centre); and Brad Woodside (Fredericton - far right), have all indicated various levels of support for the policy that is gaining more interest across Canada.

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Local economies would benefit from basic income policy: Victoria mayor

By Roderick Benns

Publisher of Leaders and Legacies, a social purpose news site

The mayor of Victoria, Lisa Helps, says basic income policy and robust local economies go hand in hand.

“There is a strong link between having a basic income and creating a strong local economy. There is more money to circulate and it supports the ‘buy local’ movement,” she says.

“So that means it’s good for the people who need more to live on, but also for the goods and services being sold by our business community,” Helps says.

Many Canadian mayors were invited to complete a national survey by Leaders and Legacies, in order to gauge municipal level support for a basic income guarantee policy. Her city – Victoria – represents the sixth provincial or territorial capital leader to support the policy.

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Ten Ontario mayors call for basic income policy

By Roderick Benns

Publisher of Leaders and Legacies, a social purpose news site

Ten mayors from cities and towns across Ontario are speaking out in favour of basic income guarantee policy.

Mayors across Canada were asked to complete a national survey by Leaders and Legacies, in order to gauge municipal level support for a basic income guarantee policy. Results are slowing being released as data is gathered.

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Mayor of Iqaluit says basic income would bring dignity to Nunavut

By Roderick Benns

The mayor of Iqaluit, the capital of Nunavut, says basic income policy would bring dignity and equity to Canada’s largest territory.

Mayor Mary Wilman (pictured left) says the multiple challenges of northern living on Baffin Island and in the rest of Nunavut are so great that citizens need basic income policy to lift them out of poverty.

“Due to a lack of roads and access, the only means of getting food here is through an annual shipping route and by air,” says Wilman. “That means we have to pay about three times as much for food as people pay in the south.”

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