Basic income: Time to separate work from security of income

By Rob Rainer

One of the biggest worries about adopting a Basic Income Guarantee in Canada is its so-called ‘work disincentive.’

We have all grown up believing that in order to eat, to be housed, to be secure, we must work. And who has not thought that there is a linear relationship between work effort and well-being?

This correlation is now untrue, if ever it were. Countless people work hard yet struggle daily to survive, while others may not work at all yet enjoy the most sumptuous cuisine and the most luxurious surroundings. As has been said, if hard work equated with wealth, every woman in Africa would be a millionaire.

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Manitoba farm family’s ‘Mincome truck’ a symbol of common sense

By Roderick Benns 

Publisher of Leaders and Legacies, a social purpose news site

The best story Ron Hikel ever heard about the famous ‘Mincome’ experiment from the 1970s has to do with a simple pick-up truck.

Mincome stands for minimum income – something that was given to about a third of the people who lived in Dauphin, Manitoba. It was a bold experiment started by the federal Liberal government to see what people would do with free money from the state.

Ron Hikel was the executive director of the Mincome project, a program that ran from from 1974 through 1978. When a Dutch TV crew showed up at his doorstep last year in Toronto to talk to him about Mincome, they then went on to Dauphin where the experiment had made everyone in the town eligible to apply for monthly income supplementation, based on earned income and family size.

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Stage now set for a basic income in Canada

Jean-Yves Duclos, federal minister of families, children and social development, stated to both CBC Radio and the Globe and Mail last week that a guaranteed minimum income is a policy worthy of discussion, once the promised enhancements to child tax benefits occur — an existing kind of minimum income for families with children.

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Canadian Association of Social Workers calls for basic income

The Canadian Association of Social Workers (CASW) is hopeful for the future of Canadian social and economic policy after recent comments made by the Jean-Yves Duclos, Minister of Families, Children, and Social Development.

The Minister stated that the concept of a guaranteed minimum income may have merit for Canadians.

“A guaranteed annual or basic income involves a government ensuring that each citizen receives a minimum income regardless of their employment status,” highlighted Morel Caissie, CASW president.

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Basic income: Significant implications for food and farmers

By Aric McBay

The national movement for a Basic Income Guarantee is gaining ground. The heart of the Basic Income Guarantee (BIG) is a government program that would ensure every person in Canada a certain amount of income every year to “to meet basic needs and live with dignity.” And this could have big implications for food and farming.

Dr. Elaine Power, an author and professor at Queen’s University, is excited about BIG’s momentum. “To me it feels like we’ve reached Gladwell’s proverbial tipping point,” she says. “It’s taken off like wildfire. A bit of effort, a lot of results.” 

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Region of Waterloo will discuss basic income guarantee

By Melissa Murray

Regional councillors will discuss asking the federal government to start a dialogue about a basic income guarantee for all Canadians later this year.

Coun. Elizabeth Clarke asked that staff prepare a report and resolution for consideration by regional councillors. It’s expected to return to committee in late April or early May.

“There is a growing movement of municipalities, as well as provinces and territories, that are putting some pressure on the federal government to look at this,” Clarke said in an interview last week. 

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Duclos eyes guaranteed minimum income to tackle poverty

By Bill Curry

The Globe and Mail

The federal minister responsible for reducing poverty says he is interested in the idea of a guaranteed income in Canada.

Veteran economist Jean-Yves Duclos, who is Minister of Families, Children and Social Development, told The Globe and Mail the concept has merit as a policy to consider after the government implements more immediate reforms promised during the election campaign.

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