Kingston documentary focuses on BIG local and global movement

by Hollie Pratt-Campbell 

You could say Kingston is something of a leader in Canada when it comes to advocating for a basic income guarantee (BIG).

In December 2015, Kingston City Council became the first municipality in Canada to endorse the idea, and did so unanimously. One of Canada’s foremost advocates for BIG is former senator Hugh Segal, also from Kingston, and the city has an active and influential advocacy group, called Kingston Action Group for a Basic Income Guarantee (KAG4BIG).

“I think it’s safe to say that our Kingston group is the most active and organized of the local basic income groups in Ontario,” says Jamie Swift, a journalist and member of KAG4BIG.

“I think it’s safe to say that our Kingston group is the most active and organized of the local basic income groups in Ontario,” says Jamie Swift, a journalist and member of KAG4BIG.

A basic income, as it relates to the concept of BIG, is defined as “a periodic cash payment unconditionally delivered to all on an individual basis, without means-test or work requirement.” In a nutshell, supporters believe that every person should be paid a set amount — for example, $1,000 per month — by the government, thereby eliminating or drastically reducing the need for the current welfare system and freeing citizens from many of the stresses of precarious work.

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